Art at Lunch

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Bring your lunch and enjoy discussions and lectures with scholars and artists covering a variety of topics related to PAFA’s exhibitions, collections, and areas of interest.

Art At Lunch programs are FREE and no registration is required.

All Art At Lunch events are held on Wednesdays, from 12 noon until 1:00 PM, in the Historic Landmark Building's Hamilton Auditorium.

For more information, contact Abby King at (215) 391-4806 or email aking@pafa.org.

Spring 2019 Art-at-Lunch lectures are made possible in memory of Mildred T. Lefkoe, a beloved member of the docent corps, having been its first vice president, 1987-89, and president, 1989-91.


Upcoming Events

Community Education

January 30, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Philadelphia International: Modern and Contemporary African American Art

Philadelphia has been a significant site for African American cultural production, from the Colonial era to the present. Bring your lunch and join us for a discussion on this topic with Blake Bradford, former Director of the Lincoln University-Barnes Foundation Museum Studies program.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

February 13, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | From the Schuylkill to the Hudson: Landscapes of the Early American Republic

From the Early Republic until the Centennial Exhibition in 1876, Philadelphia was an important site for landscape painting traditions that ultimately shaped the better-known Hudson River School movement. Curator of Historical American Art, Anna Marley, previews From the Schuylkill to the Hudson, a summer 2019 PAFA exhibition that illuminates the growth of the genre from its early roots to its rise into a public consciousness.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

February 27, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Junctures: Women in the Arts

In their new book, Judith K. Brodsky and Ferris Olin investigate how art can be a catalyst for social justice by examining the lives of thirteen 20th century women ranging from Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, a member of the Salish Kootenai nation, to the legendary Anne d’Harnoncourt. Brodsky and Olin are both Distinguished Professors Emeriti, Rutgers University and founding directors of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

March 6, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | From Charles Wilson Peale to Robert Mapplethorpe: Philadelphia on the Front Lines in the Fight for Artistic Freedom

Most Americans believe they are entitled to nearly limitless freedom of artistic expression, but throughout our history, artists have faced significant difficulties in engaging provocative subjects, especially in finding patrons and institutions willing to support them in doing so. Scholar Amy Werbel discusses how no city gave birth to more artists, patrons, and curators on the front lines of the fight for artistic freedom than Philadelphia.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

April 3, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Whitman at 200: Art and Democracy

Walt Whitman, America’s “poet of democracy,” turns 200 in 2019. To mark the bicentennial, curators Judith Tannenbaum and Lynne Farrington have organized Whitman at 200: Art and Democracy, a region-wide series of cultural events and artistic commissions. Learn from the experts about Whitman’s connection to the Philadelphia/Camden region, including his friendships with Thomas Eakins and Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

April 24, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | From Pennsylvania Coal Country to the Nation’s Capital: Franz Kline, “the Action Painter par excellence”

Born in the coal-mining town of Wilkes-Barre, PA, Franz Kline was feted in the nation’s capital shortly after his death for the Americanness of his painting. Dr. AnnMarie Perl examines three related paradoxes: why was Kline, who worked from sketches, hailed as “the Action Painter par excellence”; how did the avant-garde movement of Abstract Expressionism become a propaganda tool in the Cold War; how did Kline’s abstractions register industrialization, urbanization and suburbanization in America at mid-century.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium