Stories of Impact

PAFA on Paper

Left to right: Barkley L. Hendricks, Iconic Dexter, 2008. Richard Tuttle, The Missing Portrait, 2008. Farah Ossouli, Nostalgia, 2014.

Left to right: Barkley L. Hendricks, Iconic Dexter, 2008. Richard Tuttle, The Missing Portrait, 2008. Farah Ossouli, Nostalgia, 2014.

Since launching the PAFA First Campaign, PAFA has elevated its reputation as a nationally-recognized center for printmaking. Earlier this year, PAFA acquired The Brodsky Center, a collaborative paper and printmaking center that works with emerging and established artists to produce original works on paper. The Brodsky Center has now become part of the school at PAFA, and provides internship and professional opportunities for students to learn about the processes of editioning, marketing, and selling artists’ prints. Soon, PAFA will also begin construction on a new papermaking facility to become part of The Brodsky Center, a resource that is in high demand from students. 

PAFA's curators have also recently collaborated with numerous prestigious printmakers and presses. This year, we announced a partnership with the Paulson Fontaine Press, which included the acquisition of 129 prints. Much like PAFA, the Paulson Fontaine Press is committed to highlighting the work of women artists, artists of color, and other American artists overlooked by the mainstream. PAFA is also currently working with The Brandywine Workshop and Archives to acquire important prints and organize a related exhibition. The Brandywine Workshop is a diversity-driven organization that promotes art created through collaboration and processes that employ conventional as well as emerging technologies. Last year, PAFA acquired over 60 prints from the Experimental Printmaking Institute at Lafayette College, and highlighted the works in the exhibition A Collaborative Language

The significant progress that we have made to improve our printmaking programs would not be possible without our dedicated donors. Julie Jensen Bryan and Robert Bryan have been among PAFA’s most dedicated supporters for over three decades. Last year, they were inspired to make their largest and most meaningful commitment to PAFA to date, with a gift of $500,000 to name The Julie Jensen Bryan and Robert Bryan Printmaking Studio.

The Bryans have long demonstrated a passion for supporting the development of PAFA’s students—Julie is a devoted member of PAFA’s Women’s Board, and Julie and Robert were honored at the Annual Student Exhibition Preview Party in 2015. Julie also has a particular interest in printmaking, and serves on the board of The Print Center in Philadelphia. “Learning more about the campaign helped us understand how committed PAFA is to creating new opportunities for students,” says Julie. “Supporting the printmaking program felt naturally like the best way for us to do our part to support these plans.”

Through these partnerships and the support of donors like Julie and Robert, PAFA is rapidly becoming a hub for contemporary printmaking. Visit pafa.org/printmaking to learn more.


Preserving More than 200 Years of Art History

Archivist Hoang Tran displaying works on paper.

Archivist Hoang Tran displaying works on paper.

The Dorothy & Kenneth Woodcock Archives, situated on the newly-renovated fifth floor of the Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building, documents the history and activities of PAFA's directors, curators, and all other departments involved in programs and operations since our founding in 1805. Our archival collections also include the personal papers and manuscripts of individuals related to the Museum, as well as private archives and papers of artists, galleries, and art historians.

Learn more about this valuable resource for PAFA students, art historians, and members of the public.


The Broad Street Studio: A Window into the Creative Process

The dynamic new Broad Street Studio.

The dynamic new Broad Street Studio.

The Broad Street Studio, dedicated by The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation in memory of Barbara L. Greenfield, was completed in the fall of 2016. In its first year, the Studio played host to over a dozen exhibitions of student work, putting PAFA’s dual mission as both a museum and school of the fine arts on dramatic display.  This valuable new public space—located directly on the corner of North Broad Street and Lenfest Plaza—is one of the most dynamic and visible projects made possible by the PAFA First Campaign.

Visit PAFA Perspectives to hear faculty member Stuart Shils describe some of the ways that students have utilized the Broad Street Studio, such as the performance-installation Expunge by MFA student Melissa Joseph, and MFA student Mike Schley's installation Measurements


The Historic Cast Hall

PAFA's Historic Cast Hall

PAFA's Historic Cast Hall

PAFA's Historic Landmark Building is home not only to one of the finest collections of American paintings, drawings and sculptures in the world, but also features a large gallery space dedicated to rare plaster casts. The Historic Cast Hall is a valuable resource for PAFA's students to hone their skills in drawing and sculpting from models.

Through critical infrastructural improvements made possible by the PAFA First Campaign, we have helped ensure that our historic building and the treasure trove of artwork and casts stored inside will be preserved for generations.

Read a history of the Cast Hall by PAFA's Painting Chair Al Gury.


Preparing Illustrators for a Career

Frank Genuardi, PAFA Illustration Student

Frank Genuardi, PAFA Illustration Student

The Illustration program was officially introduced at PAFA in the fall of 2015 but there is a long-standing tradition of illustration at the academy. Frank Genuardi is among the growing body of PAFA Illustration students who are benefitting from the Illustration studio classrooms on the fifth floor of the Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building. The transformation of 25,000 square feet into new facilities to support the Illustration and Low-Residency MFA programs were made possible by the PAFA First campaign. According to Frank, “I think the new fifth floor makes the school feel complete. It may be the only place where you can see students doing research, relaxing, working on computers, learning in class, studying, or working on a project all on the same floor. One of the things that makes the floor unique is that while we are going to and from class, we are constantly reminded of the great works of art in the PAFA collection as we pass the Archives and Works on Paper collection. As an illustrator, having the computer lab, multipurpose media studio, library, and the work classrooms all close to each other on the same floor is so invaluable.”

Read a conversation between Frank, Dean Clint Jukkala, and Jessica Abel, the Chair of PAFA’s Illustration Program, and Illustration student Frank Genuardi, about Fine Arts training, illustrating in a digital age, and preparing for life after graduation. 


Visit PAFA Perspectives to stay up-to-date with the latest stories from our school and museum.