Public Program

Community Education

September 17, 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm

Rebecca Rutstein: Convergence

Rebecca Rutstein’s new mural Convergence is a 60x100-foot mural on the Schuylkill River trail, created with Mural Arts Philadelphia. The mural celebrates the river and surrounding environment as it winds through Central Philadelphia, a fitting project for Rutstein, who is both an artist and an ocean explorer working at the intersection of art, science and technology. Rutstein will discuss how her art engages with her interests in geology, microbiology, and marine science, and her passion for forging a dialogue about environmental stewardship in the face of climate change.

Cost: Free with Registration

Location: Rhoden Art Center

Community Education

December 14, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm

Director’s Tour of the American Landscape

Join Brooke Davis Anderson, the Edna S. Tuttleman Director of the Museum, for an intimate look at PAFA’s major exhibition project From the Schuylkill to the Hudson and learn about the insights, surprising contexts and unanticipated questions that have been most compelling during this historic exhibition project.

Cost: $15/ Free for Members.

Location: Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building

Community Education

November 2, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Special Tour: We Drink the River

Where does our tap water come from? Where does our waste water go? Join the Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center for a behind the scenes bus tour of the Philadelphia Water Department’s drinking water system. Learn how it’s connected to our rivers, including past and present-day infrastructure that brings us clean and safe drinking water every day.

Cost: $15/ Free for Members.

Location: Meet at Fairmount Water Works (640 Waterworks Drive)

Community Education

December 7, 2019 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm

Points of View Speaker Series: Public Dialogues: Landscapes Are Not Neutral

Landscapes show more than just the beauty of the natural environment – they also reveal the biases, agendas and historical problems of the times from which they come. This afternoon of expert talks seeks to acknowledge the missing stories and difficult narratives embedded in early American landscape traditions of representation, bringing to the foreground the role of native populations, women, and people of color during the early years of the American experiment.

Cost: $25 // $10 PAFA members and students

Location: Rhoden Arts Center, Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building

Community Education

November 9, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm

Points of View Speaker Series: Stories of the River with Beth Kephart

The Schuylkill River has run through the dreams and ambitions of Philadelphia and her guests—the walkers, the rowers, the philosophers and politicians and scientists. Philadelphia-area writer Beth Kephart has been writing the river for more than a decade—in an “autobiography” called Flow: The Life and Times of Philadelphia’s Schuylkill River, in Centennial-era novels, in works of journalism and in essays. Kephart will share river-rich scenes of her own before opening the conversation to participants to share river stories of their own.

Cost: $15/ Free for Members.

Location: Rhoden Arts Center, Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building

Community Education

October 26, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm

Points of View Speaker Series: City Water, City Life

In City Water, City Life, historian and author Carl Smith explores the development of the first successful waterworks systems in Philadelphia, Boston, and Chicago between the 1790s and the 1860s. Smith shows how the discussion, design, and use of waterworks reveal how Americans framed their conceptions of urban democracy and how they understood the natural and the built environment, individual health and the well-being of society, and the qualities of time and history. Smith is the Franklyn Bliss Snyder Professor of English & American Studies at Northwestern University. This program is presented with the Philadelphia Water Works.

Cost: $15/ Free for Members.

Location: Rhoden Arts Center, Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building

Community Education

November 16, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm

PAFA Performances: Swarthmore Early Music Ensemble

Critical Mass is a student-led vocal ensemble at Swarthmore College that performs music of the European Middle Ages and Renaissance. Driven by interest in the diversity of music spanning 800 years, past repertoire has included early polyphony, Italian madrigals, Byzantine chant, and the music of the German mystic, Hildegard of Bingen. Critical Mass brings a scholarly and imaginative lens to all its performances, researching historical practice and discovering how old music can still speak to listeners today.

Cost: $15/ Free for Members.

Location: Rotunda, Historic Landmark Building

Community Education

December 11, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: The Allure and Power of Shiny Objects: Liza Lou’s Bead-Encrusted Sculptures and Related Artworks

During the last quarter-century, American artists have produced powerful and seductive sculptures featuring brightly colored, nontraditional materials. These range from cross-stitched works by Elaine Reichek to Faith Ringgold’s story-quilts, mixed-media extravaganzas by Rina Banerjee, and the quirky three-dimensional still-lifes for which Liza Lou is known. This lavishly illustrated program with scholar Nancy Heller will focus on Lou, placing her work into its broader sociopolitical context, and explore how feminism, religion, and humor are expressed through the unlikely medium of colored glass beads.

Cost: Free to everyone. No reservation required.

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

November 6, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic

How did maps and mapmakers help create the United States? Dr. Erin Holmes, lead curator of Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic at the American Philosophical Society, will explore the way maps, as both artworks and practical tools, had political and social meaning that created and extended the physical, political, and ideological boundaries of the new nation while creating and reinforcing structural inequalities in the Early Republic.

Cost: Free to everyone. No reservation required

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

October 16, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: Subversion in Stone: Understanding Harriet Hosmer and Heteropatriarchy

Harriet Hosmer has been called the World’s First Successful Woman Sculpture and in this lecture Temple PHD student Lily F. Scott argues for the necessity of a multilayered, intersectional approach when interpreting Harriet Hosmer’s work. Taking into account the frequently overlooked aspects of Hosmer’s life including her lesbianism, Scott asserts that the application of feminist queer theory to an analysis of Hosmer’s Neoclassical sculptures greatly contributes to a more nuanced interpretation of her work and an understanding of how Hosmer’s art served as a mechanism to subvert the patriarchal and heterosexual norms of the world around her.

Cost: Free. No Registration Required

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

September 25, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: The Fluid Line: Waterscapes by American Painter-Etchers

Americans first devoted etching to the reproduction of paintings, but in the mid-nineteenth century, artists began to recognize the medium’s potential for original expression, and they would come to be called “painter-etchers” for their practice of more expressive draftsmanship. Landscapes, especially water views, supplied a primary source of inspiration for American painter-etchers and the rich selection of prints in Etch and Flow help to tell this story. Dive into this exhibition with curator, Ramey Mize who will demonstrate the range and fluid spontaneity of the etched line.

Cost: Free. No Registration Required

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

September 11, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: The Most Perfect Manner, Paul Weber’s American Landscapes

After immigrating to Philadelphia in 1848, German-born artist Paul Weber (1823-1916) became one of the leading Hudson River School painters of his time. A proponent of outdoor sketching, he taught a number of students, including Edward Moran and William Trost Richards. Using Weber’s 1856 Landscape: Evening, University of Delaware Phd student Thomas Busciglio will explore the career of this lesser-known transatlantic figure.

Cost: Free. No Registration Required.

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

December 15, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Family Arts Academy: Stringing it Together

Use vibrant watercolor paints and string to collaborate on designs that use color and shape to tell a story about your family’s creativity and collaboration.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

December 8, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Family Arts Academy: Ocean Without a Shore

Consider the significance of water as an important symbol in Bill Viola’s video installations and make your own mysterious self-portrait with this basic element.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

December 1, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm

Family Arts Academy: The Art of Ballet

Join us for a ballet performance by the Academy of International Ballet and create artworks inspired by performance and movement.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

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