Art At Noon

Community Education

December 11, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: The Allure and Power of Shiny Objects: Liza Lou’s Bead-Encrusted Sculptures and Related Artworks

During the last quarter-century, American artists have produced powerful and seductive sculptures featuring brightly colored, nontraditional materials. These range from cross-stitched works by Elaine Reichek to Faith Ringgold’s story-quilts, mixed-media extravaganzas by Rina Banerjee, and the quirky three-dimensional still-lifes for which Liza Lou is known. This lavishly illustrated program with scholar Nancy Heller will focus on Lou, placing her work into its broader sociopolitical context, and explore how feminism, religion, and humor are expressed through the unlikely medium of colored glass beads.

Cost: Free to everyone. No reservation required.

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

November 6, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic

How did maps and mapmakers help create the United States? Dr. Erin Holmes, lead curator of Mapping a Nation: Shaping the Early American Republic at the American Philosophical Society, will explore the way maps, as both artworks and practical tools, had political and social meaning that created and extended the physical, political, and ideological boundaries of the new nation while creating and reinforcing structural inequalities in the Early Republic.

Cost: Free to everyone. No reservation required

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

October 16, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: Subversion in Stone: Understanding Harriet Hosmer and Heteropatriarchy

Harriet Hosmer has been called the World’s First Successful Woman Sculpture and in this lecture Temple PHD student Lily F. Scott argues for the necessity of a multilayered, intersectional approach when interpreting Harriet Hosmer’s work. Taking into account the frequently overlooked aspects of Hosmer’s life including her lesbianism, Scott asserts that the application of feminist queer theory to an analysis of Hosmer’s Neoclassical sculptures greatly contributes to a more nuanced interpretation of her work and an understanding of how Hosmer’s art served as a mechanism to subvert the patriarchal and heterosexual norms of the world around her.

Cost: Free. No Registration Required

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

September 25, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: The Fluid Line: Waterscapes by American Painter-Etchers

Americans first devoted etching to the reproduction of paintings, but in the mid-nineteenth century, artists began to recognize the medium’s potential for original expression, and they would come to be called “painter-etchers” for their practice of more expressive draftsmanship. Landscapes, especially water views, supplied a primary source of inspiration for American painter-etchers and the rich selection of prints in Etch and Flow help to tell this story. Dive into this exhibition with curator, Ramey Mize who will demonstrate the range and fluid spontaneity of the etched line.

Cost: Free. No Registration Required

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

September 11, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Noon: The Most Perfect Manner, Paul Weber’s American Landscapes

After immigrating to Philadelphia in 1848, German-born artist Paul Weber (1823-1916) became one of the leading Hudson River School painters of his time. A proponent of outdoor sketching, he taught a number of students, including Edward Moran and William Trost Richards. Using Weber’s 1856 Landscape: Evening, University of Delaware Phd student Thomas Busciglio will explore the career of this lesser-known transatlantic figure.

Cost: Free. No Registration Required.

Location: Rhoden Arts Center

Community Education

April 24, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Franz Kline: From Pennsylvania Coal Country to the Nation’s Capital

Born in the coal-mining town of Wilkes-Barre, PA, Franz Kline was feted in the nation’s capital shortly after his death for the Americanness of his painting. Dr. AnnMarie Perl examines three related paradoxes: why was Kline, who worked from sketches, hailed as “the Action Painter par excellence”; how did the avant-garde movement of Abstract Expressionism become a propaganda tool in the Cold War; how did Kline’s abstractions register industrialization, urbanization and suburbanization in America at mid-century.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

April 3, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Whitman at 200: Art and Democracy

Walt Whitman, America’s “poet of democracy,” turns 200 in 2019. To mark the bicentennial, curators Judith Tannenbaum and Lynne Farrington have organized Whitman at 200: Art and Democracy, a region-wide series of cultural events and artistic commissions. Learn from the experts about Whitman’s connection to the Philadelphia/Camden region, including his friendships with Thomas Eakins and Joseph and Elizabeth Robins Pennell.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

March 6, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | From Charles Willson Peale to Robert Mapplethorpe: Philadelphia on the Front Lines in the Fight for Artistic Freedom

Most Americans believe they are entitled to nearly limitless freedom of artistic expression, but throughout our history, artists have faced significant difficulties in engaging provocative subjects, especially in finding patrons and institutions willing to support them in doing so. Scholar Amy Werbel discusses how no city gave birth to more artists, patrons, and curators on the front lines of the fight for artistic freedom than Philadelphia.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

February 27, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Junctures: Women in the Arts

In their new book, Judith K. Brodsky and Ferris Olin investigate how art can be a catalyst for social justice by examining the lives of thirteen 20th century women ranging from Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, a member of the Salish Kootenai nation, to the legendary Anne d’Harnoncourt. Brodsky and Olin are both Distinguished Professors Emeriti, Rutgers University and founding directors of the Rutgers Center for Women in the Arts and Humanities.

Cost: Free

Location: Hamilton Auditorium, Historic Landmark Building

Community Education

February 13, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | From the Schuylkill to the Hudson: Landscapes of the Early American Republic

From the Early Republic until the Centennial Exhibition in 1876, Philadelphia was an important site for landscape painting traditions that ultimately shaped the better-known Hudson River School movement. Curator of Historical American Art, Anna Marley, previews From the Schuylkill to the Hudson, a summer 2019 PAFA exhibition that illuminates the growth of the genre from its early roots to its rise into a public consciousness.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

January 30, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Philadelphia International: Modern and Contemporary African American Art

Philadelphia has been a significant site for African American cultural production, from the Colonial era to the present. Bring your lunch and join us for a discussion on this topic with Blake Bradford, former Director of the Lincoln University-Barnes Foundation Museum Studies program.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium

Community Education

January 16, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Art at Lunch | Postindustrialism: Design Routes Between Colonialism and the Cold War

How did India in the 20th century serve as a conduit of ideas around craft, design, and technology between Great Britain and the United States? Sria Chatterjee explores the changing history of post-industrialism in the context of the "long" Arts and Crafts movement in this installment of PAFA's "Art At Lunch" series—don't forget to bring your lunch.

Cost: Free, no registration required.

Location: Historic Landmark Building, Hamilton Auditorium